PlaYeRaNoN

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    40
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About PlaYeRaNoN

  • Rank
    Filthy casul
  • Birthday 07/24/1998

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    Gaming, 3D modeling, Animation and cooking disasters
  • Location
    Chilling with moose in an igloo

Previous Fields

  • Favorite Fire Emblem Game
    Awakening

Member Badge

  • Members
    Hector

Allegiance

  • I fight for...
    Tellius

Recent Profile Visitors

650 profile views
  1. Fire Emblem: Blood at Dusk

    A while ago I started playing around with Nightmare, FEditor Adv, Anvil and such, and some limitations that come with hacking. Baby steps. Anyway Dual guard would most likely be less... hard to implement than dual strike. Bloodlines successfully introduced the Shove command in the GBA game. Interactive fields/zones between chapters? Maybe not so much, I'll see in due time. The first thing that struck me is how user friendly those softwares (and their modules) are. Really realizing people took the time to create them, accessible with notes and documentation. That's humbling. For now I'll try and play around at least one hour everyday with the tools. Since it's the end of the semester, this is not guaranteed- but, it's a good investment of time. I'll be fully available this January.
  2. Ideas and models for a what if: "Fire Emblem 64"

    No problem. If you decide to try them and need a few pointers, feel free to ask.
  3. Ideas and models for a what if: "Fire Emblem 64"

    Since the principles are the same, the learning curve is roughly the same for both of them. Knowing the basics of modeling means you roughly know both- good topology, etc. Blender is free and open source, has tons and tutorials and a thriving community, and it can do most of the things Maya can, so I'm told. Each have their different set of tools and plugins to take into account. Arnold is Maya's rendering powerhouse. Unfold 3D plugin can help you get a clean job with uvs fast. And Nucleus is just great dynamic simulation engine for cloth, hair, effects, you name it. It might come as obvious I only know Maya, and trust me as a beginner I thought its UI all over the place, but it's a mini-studio all by itself. Still, I'd start with Blender and choose later. If you're also a student it's possible to freely install Maya, Mudbox (sculpting & texturing) for a period of 3 years. A few other compagnies do that too, like Foundry's 1 year for Mari (3D painting), Nuke (compositing) and Modo (modeling). Simpler than that, you can export your uvs and paint over them with softwares like of Photoshop: good uvs is usually the most important part, no matter the SW you're using. How you cut and organize your shells along with managing texture resolution and the like... What I mean is, in no way do you need to pay subscriptions for fancy stuff, especially for passion projects. PaintCube, Sculptris, Blender, search a bit and you'll find what you need. Cheers!
  4. Huh. This is a surprisingly calm thread. The trailer took me by surprise, that's for sure. A lot of people noticed the attention to details, and the main characters seem interesting enough. Most designs are surprisingly well integrated, they might stick as odd alone but in the live action's world they're set in, at least for me the pokemon are designed well. I can't apply that sentiment to Psyduck and Jigglypuff, though.
  5. SRPG studio project: Divine Herald

    I'm glad- if this ends up helping. I know this is probably not what you are looking for, buuut at least it's there. Don't get me wrong, I'm a complete noob but I feel using the applications you feel are best for the task at hand and work best with your workflow (and time constraints) is a good way to go. Don't be scared to explore new software: might have interesting tools to use that could save you time. But really, you could probably do the entirety of your artistic work on photoshop or even paint.NET. If it doesn't work? You could collaborate with other artists and creators- if a common agreement is met. You not only have concepts but material to showcase and work with, and that's more than people usually have. Cheers!
  6. Fire Emblem: Downfall

    Interesting, yet I like the idea of a secret ending better than a locked ending. 8-9 endings is already more than enough replay value. Nine lords seems like one hell of a ride.
  7. What are the cores themes and messages of your story? It will help you tremendously in figuring out the the ideas and game features you want to develop. What aspects or concepts do your legendaries rule? What is their place in the world of your creation? What will Barong do during the story? Will they be more involved? It would be nice if, like Tapukoko in S&M, they appear once or twice to assist the player indirectly or not. They seem to be portrayed as the "good" to Rangda's "evil".
  8. new hack idea

    Joshua is nice and all, don't get me wrong, but Gerik's the bro, man.
  9. Ideas and models for a what if: "Fire Emblem 64"

    If you need assistance with the modeling, texturing or rigging of your models, I can probably help you with the assets. Out of curiosity, what softwares are you using? I'm looking forward to what you're up to- cheers, bud.
  10. SRPG studio project: Divine Herald

    Kind of late to the party, but do you have a specific style in mind? And would you be comfortable with making your own sprites? A real sprite editor, it's tricky, since the assets are sometimes borrowed or may not be free to use or commercialize. Anyways, some links that could be useful: Free, easy interface, lets you create animations: https://www.piskelapp.com/ Way overkill, but let's you do 2D rigs. Also, purchasable ressource packs: https://brashmonkey.com/ I have no idea what this one's about but it's there: https://www.codeandweb.com/sprite-sheet-maker
  11. Fire Emblem: Blood at Dusk

    An update, as promised! I made a small outline for a prototype I want to start with, a htlm file made with Twine. I don't have quite as much time as I want to explore the software as I want to, but that's irrelevent. Starting small- at least trying to give the project a more realistic size. Still, I get I'm just throwing ideas in the void. I want that project to happen, so I'll work for it. Like always, feedback is invaluable. G'night, I'm going to hit the hay sleeping like a log catching some Zs. DEMO-Avaenture.7z EDIT: While I'm at it, I'll add details on the mechanics I aim for in this one. The game should encourage the players to explore its characters and invite them to favor crafting and customisation over shops. MECHANICS: FEATURED CHARACTERS:
  12. Fire Emblem: Blood at Dusk

    Small update, I'm not dead (nor giving up) just in college. 3D animation is fascinating. That, and everyone's stuck in the wonderful development period that is pre-prod to production transition, and that's one hell of a ride. If I don't go brain dead, I'll update soon, have a more concrete direction, etc.
  13. Fire Emblem: Blood at Dusk

    A god amongst men :oo
  14. Fire Emblem: Blood at Dusk

    I'm aware of how much of a hell game development (or hacking) can be. And like everyone starting, the project way too much ambitious- half of it is wishful thinking. I'm not realistically going to be able to cram every possible feature in one game, alone, especially with no experience whatsoever- that's ludicrous. Not that I mind, my two main objectives are to tell the story I want to and make it fun for for others. The project still being in its infancy, it has to flexible. Best to make a nice, short experience than a mediocre one who leaves a sour taste in people's mouths, eh? I guess I might want to start real slow.
  15. Fire Emblem: Blood at Dusk

    Yes, at least I'd like to. It would most likely use Sacred Stones as a base, but that's not set in stone either. I'd have to do my research on hacking- I was a bit hasty when posting this, but I also needed feedback. People say a world map makes things too easy, but in the end it's the player's decision to grind for levels. To be honest I'm not too fond of infinitely playing the same skirmish battles, but it's nice to get more control on your units' progression. It also helps the player get a better grasp on the story's setting, and branching battles could be used to impact the narrative.