Dan

Fire Emblem Cipher - Rules and Q&A

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  1. 1. What kind of wiki should Cipher have? Explanations for these choices are in/around post 160

    • Serenes Forest wiki
    • Dediciated wikia
    • Either option is fine


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A more comprehensive and recently-updated version of the FE Cipher Rules can be found on the FE Cipher Wiki here.

The Play Area for each player:
ZKvd1G5.png

The card:
ayPpj4M.png

To begin the game:

Each player places his/her Lord facedown in the Front Line

Players decide (by Rock/Paper/Scissors, flipping a coin, rolling a die, etc.) who will go first

Each player draws a hand of 6 cards.

Each player has a chance to Mulligan, which means to return all cards from his/her hand to the deck and shuffle it, then draw a new hand of 6 cards

Next each player places the top 5 cards of his/her deck into the Orb Area, facedown.

Both players flip their Lords face-up simultaneously and the game begins, starting with the player who it was determined earlier would be going first.


Turn Structure:

Opening Phase - Draw one card and "untap" all characters

Bond Phase - Place one card from your hand into the Bond Area

Deployment Phase - Play cards or Class Change

Action Phase - Attack, Move, and use Skills

End Phase - Your turn ends and the opponent's begins

Opening Phase, Bond Phase, and End Phase are automatic; they are always exactly the same.

Deployment Phase:

Each card has a Cost in the circle in the top left corner. The Cost is what it takes to put a card into the Battlefield Area from your hand. A Cost is a number as well as a color. This post will talk about monocolor decks. Some information about multicolor decks will be at the end. Each card in your Bond Area counts for 1 Cost of the same color. If there are 5 Blue cards in your Bond Area, you can play 1 Blue card with Cost 5, or 5 Blue cards with Cost 1, or 1 Blue card with Cost 2 and 1 Blue card with Cost 3, etc. You can also play 1 Blue card of Cost 3 and nothing else. You do not have to use all of your Bond cards each turn. (As far as I know, Bond cards do not go away, they continue to pile up each turn.)

To the left of the Class box is another box that will say if the card is a basic (unpromoted, 下級職) Unit, or a Promoted (上級職) Unit. Promoted Units have a normal Cost as well as a Promotion Cost in a smaller circle beneath the normal Cost. They can be Deployed regularly for their normal Cost, or if a basic Unit with the same name is already in the Battlefield Area, they can be deployed by paying the Promotion Cost instead. In this case the Promoted Unit will be placed on top of the basic Unit it is Promoting from. This is also how Class Changing works. If you Change Classes, draw one card from the deck.


Action Phase:

Attacking:

The attacking player chooses Attackers.

The attacking player chooses targets for each Attacker. The targets must be within the Attackers' Ranges. Range is the number in the smaller box, just to the right of the bottom left circled number.

Each Unit's Attack Power is the number in the bottom left circle. Each card's Support Power is the number in the bottom right circle.

A Critical Attack can be performed during the Attack by discarding a card of the same name as your Attacker to double your Attacker's Attack Power. It is currently unclear whether it must be exactly the same card or if a different class version of the character can also be used. (It seems like it probably has to be the same exact card because the page this information comes from normally uses 名前 for name when talking about Class Change, but uses 名称 when talking about Critical Attacks.)

There is also something called "God Speed Evasion" that works similarly to Critical Attacks. The defending player may discard a card of the same name as the Defender. In this case, however, the Attack Powers do not matter, the attack is simply nullified as if it had not happened and both characters are safe.

Each player turns over the top card of his/her deck and puts it into the Support Area simultaneously. Add the Support Power to the Attacker's or Defender's Attack Power. Support Skills can be used at this time. Now compare the Total Attack Power of the Attacker to that of the Defender.

If the attacker has a higher Total Attack Power or if it is equal to that of the Defender, the Defender is destroyed, and the card is moved to the Discard Pile.

If the Defender that would be destroyed is the defending player's Lord, instead of destroying it the defending player chooses a card from the Orb Area and puts it into his/her hand. If there are no cards left in the Orb Area (whether before or after putting one into the hand is not clear) the Lord is defeated and the attacking player wins.

If the Defender's Total Attack Power is higher than the Attacker's, then neither is destroyed and both are safe.

An Attacker can never be destroyed as a result of combat, but a Defender may be.

If the Front Line becomes completely empty, all Rear Guard characters are moved to the Front Line. This is called a March.

Any Movement or Skill use also occurs during this Phase. When a Unit is moved, it is tapped, or turned 90º clockwise to signify that it cannot be used for anything else. This may also happen when a Unit attacks or uses a skill, it's not clear at this time.


After the Action Phase completes, the game moves to the End Phase and the next player's turn begins. Players alternate turns until one player's Lord is defeated and the other player wins.



Notes:
*Tapping means to turn card 90º clockwise to signify that it cannot be used for anything else. It is still unclear exactly when it's used. It is probably necessary to tap Units when attacking or using some Skills as well as after moving them.

A lot of questions are answered in the first few pages here.

Also read this post where FutureKnightX lists many of the rules that have been added and the post 2 posts later.

Edited by Kirie

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Wow, this is nifty, thanks~!

How does the Bond area work, exactly?

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Wow, this is nifty, thanks~!

How does the Bond area work, exactly?

You put one card into it from your deck during the second phase of each turn. When you move to the third phase you can play cards with total cost adding up to the number of cards you have in the bond area. Ayra noticed in the other thread that there are some skills that make you tap bond cards to activate them as well. I guess they work kind of like lands/mana sources from Magic the Gathering. I'm not sure if you have to tap them to play cards during the third phase or if it's only for the skills. It seems like only skills make you tap them.

btw, "Bond" is like bonds between people, like a "connection," or like ties in the phrase "family ties." I guess it's related to Supports in the video games. I can't think of a better way to translate it and this is the word that was already being used on the forums.

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I just got a moment of genius and I figured out how the bonds work for both single color and multicolor decks. It meshes perfectly all the information you presented, what I read in that blog post as well as the information Kaoz presented us earlier in the thread.

Bonds rule:

1- Each turn, you can put one card from your hand to your Bond area. You are not required to do so.

2- All your bond cards are always in the bond area at the bottom, and all these cards are always flipped sideways for easy identification (based on the stream as well as all screenshots we've seen).

3- IF you have enough bonds of the correct color, you can play your units for free. For example, if you have 3 blue bond, you can play both the Gaius and the Maribelle cards (see attached) on the same turn and still have your 3 bonds available. I know it sounds strange; bear with me a while as it actually makes sense.

4- If you do NOT have enough bonds of the correct color, you can still play the card. However, you will have to flip over bond cards equal to the cost of the card. For example, say you have in play 3 blue bonds cards and 1 red bond card and you want to play Palla (see attached) who costs 3 red bond, you will have to flip over 3 bond card of your choice. This matches Kaoz information perfectly. If you promote a card, I believe it does not matter what color bonds you have.

5- Some skills requires you to flip over bond cards. See Maribelle's first ability: you have to flip over two bond cards to play it. It also matches the icon perfectly: it depicts sideways cards being flipped over (Unlike the red cost that depicts tapping her own card).

6- Your bond cards unflip during your untap phase.

I'm confident enough on this to bet some cards on it :). Step 3 sounds strange at first glance: however when thinking further on the gameplay it makes perfect sense (and it matches the forum post perfectly).

Let us keep in mind that this game has no "spells" or "trap cards". If the game used a standard mana system, you'd be completely screwed as soon as the other player got some control over the board and you have no "board wipe" spell to re-establish the situation. So by enabling the players to play multiple units on the same turn (if they have the cards in hand of course) and by having their mana/bond free for skill usage, a player can re-establish themselves on the board even if they have no cards left on the table and the opponent has a few. This ties in perfectly with the "you draw a card when your hero takes damage" mechanism. Your board is wiped? Save your cards, take some damage to get additional cards back and re-establish yourself (hopefully) the following turn before you lose.

If both these elements were not in place, the match's winner would probably be decided in the first 2-3 turns every single game.

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post-14812-0-59306900-1429154858_thumb.png

Edited by Ayra

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(I ask questions because I didn't get a chance to see the stream, nor do I have a Nico account)

The "matching color" thing is in Weiss Schwarz, so I'm somewhat familiar with that. The bond cards unflipping is interesting - I guess they're closer to mana, in that sense. I also posted some wild theories before the stream came out, most of which are inaccurate.

This game reminds me of some unholy combination of Weiss and Vanguard, and I am not averse to this!

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1- All of the things I've read say you just do it, not you can if you want to.

2- OK, that makes sense, I didn't see the whole livestream so I missed the part where they were showing the actual game being played.

3- All of the examples say things like 5 bonds = 5 1-cost cards or 1 5-cost card or a 2-cost and a 3-cost, NOT you can play whatever you want as long as it costs 5 or less.

4- The dengeki post says that if you have both red and blue cards in your Bond Area, you can't play cards of either color. I'm pretty sure color does matter for class changing. There's no reason it wouldn't. Sure the circle is white, but that's probably just to differentiate it from the normal cost; the number is still colored.

5- That seems correct to me.

6- That's probably right, but there's always a chance that they stay flipped so you're making a bigger sacrifice when you use them. The page I read said you untap all Units, not all cards. And the Bond cards would be flipped, not tapped. Plus the dengeki page said to be careful about flipping them or you wouldn't be able to play anything else. I think they stay flipped.

Edited by Dan

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6- That's probably right, but there's always a chance that they stay flipped so you're making a bigger sacrifice when you use them. The page I read said you untap all Units, not all cards. And the Bond cards would be flipped, not tapped. Plus the dengeki page said to be careful about flipping them or you wouldn't be able to play anything else. I think they stay flipped.

This makes it a lot more interesting. Definitely feels like a cross between Weiss and Vanguard (the latter has counter-blasting, which is similar, and the former relies on colors in the level zone to play certain cards). I hope some of these units have effects that allow a player to draw!

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This makes it a lot more interesting. Definitely feels like a cross between Weiss and Vanguard (the latter has counter-blasting, which is similar, and the former relies on colors in the level zone to play certain cards). I hope some of these units have effects that allow a player to draw!

I only briefly looked at the cards, but I saw in that Gaius one Ayra posted that you draw a card when you class change into him, so there are probably more that let you draw too.

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Several of the cards can be found here. It'll make cross-referencing things a lot easier.

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Several of the cards can be found here. It'll make cross-referencing things a lot easier.

Thanks for pointing that out. I saw an interesting skill on the Lucina card; it says you can treat it as if its name was Marth. So that means you can Class Change/Promote into a Marth card and possibly (but probably not) use a Marth card to Critical Attack.

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Awesome work compiling all this info together ; )

BTW, two questions.

1. What does tapping mean? I haven't played many card games, except Pokemon.

2. Do you mind if I post this on the front page of the site? Or would you like to wait and double-check some more details first?

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1. What does tapping mean? I haven't played many card games, except Pokemon.

Tapping just means that you turn the card sideways. It generally just indicates that the effect has been used and can't be used again until the card is "untapped."

Also, nice work, Dan. Much appreciated.

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I had time to read your rules guide fully: Pretty well done, thank you! It's clear, concise and precise. Two thumbs up!

Out of the 50 minutes of the stream, only about 5 minutes were spent on the presentation of the rules via a powerpoint presentation and voiceover. It unfortunately wasn't anything close to a match, just slides with explanations and it doesn't show too much. However, there's some interesting things in it I haven't seen in any article. For example, take this screencap that Hardin posted in the other thread:

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a224/COGrit/lucinavirion_zpscufj7exo.png

You can see that the same player has two Virion in play at the same time; the exact same level 1 Virion (I would have expected that not to be possible, but there you go straight from the official stream). I'll slowly go over the stream again this weekend: now that I have more context for it maybe I'll be able to piece out more. I can take and post screencaps of all the information slides if you want (though a lot have been posted already).

In the stream they have shown picking the 4 cost Nabarl card as Lord. If I remember well, the strange thing is that on the next slide with a "battlefield representation", the Nabarl was in bottom right area of the playfield (ie. The discard pile). I might be remembering wrong... I'll rewatch when I get the occasion to and confirm or deny that!

I'm very sorry to be such a pest, but there's some points I want to comment on (Sorry!) Did you read http://tocage.jp/blog/6294/1429093137.html

? It has the clearest explanation of the rules in my opinion.

Thanks for pointing that out. I saw an interesting skill on the Lucina card; it says you can treat it as if its name was Marth. So that means you can Class Change/Promote into a Marth card and possibly (but probably not) use a Marth card to Critical Attack.

I'd be surprised if you can use a Lucina to play a promoted Marth card or vice-versa (gender-switch ahoy!) What I think it refers to is the linked abilities. For example, look at Maribelle's card. She gets (or gives?) +20 power if she's supported (or supports?) by Lissa. So my take on Lucina's ability is that every unit that has an ability that affects or is affected by Marth also affects or is affected by Lucina.

6- That's probably right, but there's always a chance that they stay flipped so you're making a bigger sacrifice when you use them. The page I read said you untap all Units, not all cards. And the Bond cards would be flipped, not tapped. Plus the dengeki page said to be careful about flipping them or you wouldn't be able to play anything else. I think they stay flipped.

Well, bond cards are actually unit cards (just in a different zones). Is it possible that dengeki meant that you won't be able to play anything else until next turn? If your bond card is flipped, it wouldn't be available to use more skills or units this turn. If the flipping is permanent (or close), the cost of skill usage would be absolutely insane. Take Maribelle again. It's an unpromoted card which only costs 1 to play: it's safe to assume that she's not gamebreaking. However, her skill requires her to flip over 2 cards. If it's permanent, to use the skill once you will basically need to have wasted 2 cards permanently, lost two turns (since you can only add one bond card per turn). That'd be an utterly insane cost to use a skill once on a basic unit and she's far from the only character with a "flip" cost.

4- The dengeki post says that if you have both red and blue cards in your Bond Area, you can't play cards of either color.

Why would anyone ever play bond cards of a different color then? It'd be impossible to play anything. Is it possible that what they meant is the following:

- If you have bonds of only 1 color, you can play your units for free (as per the link I gave earlier if I read it correctly)

- If you have bonds of two colors in play, you have to pay (flip over the required amount of bond cards)

... Maybe? It'd make sense and actually be playable (though still detrimental to play with a multi color deck).

Though if instead the following is correct:

3- All of the examples say things like 5 bonds = 5 1-cost cards or 1 5-cost card or a 2-cost and a 3-cost, NOT you can play whatever you want as long as it costs 5 or less.

It might instead mean that if you are mono-color, you are bound by that rule, but you don't have to flip over your bonds (so you have them leftover to use skills to not instantly lose your new units). If you are multi-color, you have to flip over your bonds to pay the cost.

I might be misunderstanding the blog post, but I hope not. With the rule as you state, it feels that the game would be extremely "snowball-y" with no chance to comeback since there's no spells. In fact, I can see a situation where the player that goes first puts a unit with good matching skills on turn 2 and Frederick on turn 3 would have basically won the game (Highest attack power, and have mana free to use skills on turn 4 to take instantly take out anything the other player puts out). The other player can't put anything that won't get auto-killed by the Frederick because the attacker has the advantage, and they would not be to play a good unit + use a skill before they get like 5 Bond (so they'd be losing pretty badly already before even getting a tiny chance to maybe recover).

Edit: Actually, it can work the way you stated if you have a mono-color deck... Maybe I'm misunderstanding the "free" part of the description: If you are mono-color, you are limited by the bonds amount as you stated, but you don't have to flip your bonds, so you would still have them available to play skills. So say you have 5 blue bonds, you can play 5 blue bonds worth of unit and still have 5 bonds to use for your abilities. That'd be workable and allow a player not to instantly lose in the first few turns and allow some usage of the "draw a card when damaged" clause to at least give a fighting chance to players to reestablish themselves. And it would prevent the "I'm dumping 4 units on the board on turn 1" thing too... That'd make a lot of sense all-around actually.

Edited by Ayra

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Awesome work compiling all this info together ; )

BTW, two questions.

1. What does tapping mean? I haven't played many card games, except Pokemon.

2. Do you mind if I post this on the front page of the site? Or would you like to wait and double-check some more details first?

I had tapping described in there during the attack part, but I copied it into the notes area too. You can put this wherever you want, but it's certainly not complete yet. The Japanese pages don't even have all the information yet and my Japanese isn't that great so there's probably some mistakes/misunderstandings.

Ayra-

Lucina/Marth - That's just what it says on the card. You can see it here in the skill area: http://serenesforest.net/wp-content/gallery/fetcg-cipher-1/fetcg0_lucina.png You can treat the Lucina card as if its name is Marth. I think that's pretty cool, considering how she pretends to be Marth in Awakening while she's wearing the mask.

Bond cards - We just don't have enough information yet to say whether they flip back or not.

Color - The tocage page you linked there was my main source for the rules. The problem with that page is that it doesn't say anything at all about colors because it assumes you're only playing one color. This game was made for one-color decks. The dengeki page Vincent linked in the other topic talked about having multiple colors in one deck, but it didn't give a good example so it was difficult to understand. What I've written above is the best I can figure it out based on the dengeki page. It's very possible I'm wrong about this part of the game.

I really wish they'd just publish official rules so we didn't have to guess at some of this stuff. A full game for us to watch would be nice too.

Edited by Dan

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I really wish they'd just publish official rules so we didn't have to guess at some of this stuff. A full game for us to watch would be nice too.

Definitively! You are right that we can't do more than theorize at this point without any more factual information (sorry about having been such a pest!)

The stream and presentation so far unfortunately were more about how pretty the cards are (which they most definitively are) instead of how to play the game itself. I'm sure we'll at least get paper instructions with the starter packs at least. A full stream of a match would be really nice to confirm everything. I'm not sure we'll get an official one, but I'm sure we can assume that there's going to be at least a few player videos posted on NicoNico after release.

I'm not too optimistic about the chances of my friends playing this card game for very long. The "random" supports probably won't go over too well with them and is probably going to be the killing point. Plus, they won't get all the neat thematic stuff like Lucina disguising as Marth, the bonus between Lissa and Maribelle, or the reason for the +50 attack for the pegasus triangle attack for example. The game isn't that deep at first glance either (Though in my opinion it still looks to be plenty fun). We'll see once we get the full rules! I'm sure we'll get a few good games in with the two starter packs at the very least, and at worst I'll be left with a small collection of really good looking cards about a serie I love. It could be worse!

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If this gets localized I'll try it. I love the pokemon card game to death...I'm sure I can learn this one :)

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Definitively! You are right that we can't do more than theorize at this point without any more factual information (sorry about having been such a pest!)

A pest? It's great having feedback, and you noticed things I didn't and made me look closer at stuff too. You are a great help with this.

I guess at this point we just have to wait until there's some more official stuff.

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First, off, I'm using the news articles linked on the front page (here and here).

Bond cards - We just don't have enough information yet to say whether they flip back or not.

Looks like they stay down, which leads to the next quote.

I'm not too optimistic about the chances of my friends playing this card game for very long. The "random" supports probably won't go over too well with them and is probably going to be the killing point. Plus, they won't get all the neat thematic stuff like Lucina disguising as Marth, the bonus between Lissa and Maribelle, or the reason for the +50 attack for the pegasus triangle attack for example. The game isn't that deep at first glance either (Though in my opinion it still looks to be plenty fun). We'll see once we get the full rules! I'm sure we'll get a few good games in with the two starter packs at the very least, and at worst I'll be left with a small collection of really good looking cards about a serie I love. It could be worse!

Let me tell you about a game I play. It's called Cardfight! Vanguard. There's a few elements from there that seem to be present in Cipher.

- "Random" supports. In Vanguard, the attacking player flips the top card (or two) of his/her deck when attacking with a specific unit. This is known as a drive check. This check will either reveal a normal unit (in which case it goes to hand), or a trigger unit (which will apply its effects and THEN go to hand). If a trigger is revealed, a unit of your choice gains +5000 ATK, and the trigger's secondary effect is applied (healing damage (heal), hitting for more damage (critical), allowing another unit to attack again (stand), or drawing a card (draw)). In the case of two of those triggers (stand/critical), you choose which unit to apply the effect to, and it doesn't have to be the same unit that got the attack boost. It sounds like complete and utter bullshit, but every deck must have sixteen triggers, no more, no less. Because of this, and because drive checks are revealed to both players, it's possible to count triggers, and determine the relative odds of whether or not one will appear. More often than not, games are won or lost depending on triggers!

- Negating damage. They're known as Perfect Guards (one of two types of Sentinels) in Vanguard. Max four of them in a deck, no ifs, ands, or buts. I think discarding a card of the same name's a bit rougher than drawing a perfect guard and having a card available to discard for it, but eh.

- Counter-blasting (a.k.a. "flipping cards in the Bond area"). I'm gonna digress a wee bit and explain how to lose in Vanguard - take six damage. Damage is represented by flipping the top card of your deck face-up in the damage zone. Thus, you'll have five face-up cards in your damage zone, max. To pay for certain skills, you can flip face-up cards face-down in your damage zone. This is known as "counter-blasting". Once a card is flipped face-down, it stays that way unless another card says "unflip a damage" or something like that, OR if you hit a heal trigger and are able to remove a damage from the damage zone. Here's examples for one, two, three, four, and five, as well as damage unflipping. If I'm reading Athena's card correctly (bottom of the Dengeki article), it looks like she can extend her range to 1-2 for the turn (with -10 ATK), at the cost of flipping a card in the bond area over. If so, then it would make the most sense for the bond card flipping to be permanent; otherwise, she might as well be a 1-2 unit permanently!

tl;dr - I play too much Vanguard!

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A pest? It's great having feedback, and you noticed things I didn't and made me look closer at stuff too. You are a great help with this.

Glad you see it this way! :) It could definitively have been seen as "You argue without even knowing anything".

First, off, I'm using the news articles linked on the front page (here and here).

If I'm reading Athena's card correctly (bottom of the Dengeki article), it looks like she can extend her range to 1-2 for the turn (with -10 ATK), at the cost of flipping a card in the bond area over. If so, then it would make the most sense for the bond card flipping to be permanent; otherwise, she might as well be a 1-2 unit permanently!

Not necessarily. Even if you got your bonds back each turn, if you have 4 bonds and you have 5 units on the board, you wouldn't have enough to pay for all their abilities. Losing a bond permanently (making you lose a card effectively), setting you back one turn (since you can play 1 bond per turn max) for a single turn of 1-2 range (at -10 attack) seems to be incredibly expensive and not worth it in the vast majority of cases. I suppose that the card still looks good besides that (60 attack power looks like a heck of a lot for only 2 cost), so maybe it's meant as a tiny bit bonus for the card.

Can anyone translate either Tharja or Olivia from the same Dengeki article to any degree of certainty? They both have pretty bad combat stats for their cost (Olivia especially), and Olivia in particular has only one single ability that requires you to flip over 2 cards. If bonds are turned over "permanently", that sounds incredibly prohibitive. Unless the "unflip" abilities are relatively common or accessible (For example, you could make a deck with many characters using flip abilities work if you pair them with characters that can unflip). So for example, you would not use Tharja or Olivia in a deck without cards to unflips the bonds. I could see that working... Thanks for the Cardfight Vanguard explanation! I have never played any card game with rules like those (Mostly Magic the Gathering over here), so that's useful to know!

Famitsu news! So what can we gather from that?

1) It seems to confirm that you only lose after you are damaged while you have no orbs card left. In other words, you need to take damage 6 times to lose, and not 5 as I was thinking.

2) Your hero seems to be on the board from the start (my theory was stupid anyway) and you have 4 spaces for units on both the front row and back row. What I was missing is that since moving costs you your unit's turn (so you can't move and attack same turn with a unit), if at the game start your opponent hero is stronger than yours, you can simply keep moving your hero away, which solves one of the biggest problem/question I had with the game balancing.

3) There's a lot of tapped units in these screenshots. My best guess is that you simply tap to indicate that this units turn is over (since you can play your units turn in the order you like you have to know which one's turn is over). So if you move, attack or use an ability (with tap cost), you tap your unit.

So I guess we are a tiny bit further along than we used to be! We can also see a few new cards, like the three axemen from the original games and Cordelia's basic form.

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Nah, it's not so bad as far as card games go. The problem is that we don't have an official ruleset yet, just bits and pieces from various user reports, so it sounds more complicated than it actually is.

I've noticed in the Famitsu screenshots that there's some with the playfield having both an promoted and unpromoted female Robin as separate units. That sounds strange, but I guess it does match the "two level 1 Virions" that were shown in the stream during the "attack-range" explanation. I wonder if you can put a second copy of the character you are using as your lord..? I wonder how you identify which one it is? Or actually, if there's some kind of token or whatever you put on your commander to identify easily during matches.

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Anybody got a link for that Famitsu page? Also I added some of the stuff about tapping to a section I titled "Assumptions" because we don't know if it's true yet.

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Anybody got a link for that Famitsu page? Also I added some of the stuff about tapping to a section I titled "Assumptions" because we don't know if it's true yet.

The Famitsu page is currently on SF's front page. Since the front page will eventually change, I preserved the links here (first line, second link).

I've noticed in the Famitsu screenshots that there's some with the playfield having both an promoted and unpromoted female Robin as separate units. That sounds strange, but I guess it does match the "two level 1 Virions" that were shown in the stream during the "attack-range" explanation. I wonder if you can put a second copy of the character you are using as your lord..? I wonder how you identify which one it is? Or actually, if there's some kind of token or whatever you put on your commander to identify easily during matches.

In just about every card game that I can think of, you can have multiples of the same unit on the field (I may or may not have been traumatized by Birds of Paradise in the distant past). The "lord" is probably a special type of card. Perhaps it's like Force of Will's Rulers, who have a shiny gold border to differentiate them from the other units (Ruler and not a Ruler (Resonator, to be precise)). Either way, it should be clear as to which card is the lord, and I assume that the lord isn't as scrubby as base Roy.

Can anyone translate either Tharja or Olivia from the same Dengeki article to any degree of certainty? They both have pretty bad combat stats for their cost (Olivia especially), and Olivia in particular has only one single ability that requires you to flip over 2 cards. If bonds are turned over "permanently", that sounds incredibly prohibitive. Unless the "unflip" abilities are relatively common or accessible (For example, you could make a deck with many characters using flip abilities work if you pair them with characters that can unflip). So for example, you would not use Tharja or Olivia in a deck without cards to unflips the bonds. I could see that working... Thanks for the Cardfight Vanguard explanation! I have never played any card game with rules like those (Mostly Magic the Gathering over here), so that's useful to know!

. . .and that explains their crap for attack power.

Olivia - Choose an allied unit that's already attacked, and they can attack again.

Tharja - Your opponent chooses a card in their support area, and discards it.

I'm not quite sure how important the support area will be, but it sounds like a Big Deal, if it's on par with Olivia's cost. Speaking of. . .let me introduce you to this asshole. Instead of letting someone else attack (like Olivia), he pays a similar cost to allow HIMSELF to attack again. The difference is that Olivia herself isn't going to do much in terms of damage, while DoTE is a goddamn beatstick who generates 4 cards from deck into your hand for the price of discarding a copy of himself (besides being the biggest thing on the field).

Thus, having Olivia permanently flip two bond cards is what keeps her from being broken, IMO - she'd be used as a final push, if I was in the position to do so!

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Anyone here intends to make a mini tutorial video on how to play the game when it's out? I understand most of the stuff stated here but I personally feel that it's easier to learn while watching someone play it, rather than reading a bunch of rules.

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If someone would be kind enough to mail me a couple of starter decks, maybe. But since I don't like relying on others for things, it probably won't happen unless the game's released in English.

EDIT: And I wouldn't inflict my voice on you guys unless I can help it.

Edited by eclipse

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